Waterloo

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About Waterloo

"Waterloo" was a number-one hit for country singer Stonewall Jackson in 1959. It was written by John D. Loudermilk and Marijohn Wilkin. The single was the most successful of Jackson's career, spending five weeks at number one on the U. S. country music chart. The B-side of "Waterloo", "Smoke Along the Track", reached number 24 on the country chart. "Waterloo" was also Jackson's only top 40 hit, where it stayed on the chart for 16 weeks, peaking at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart. The song tells of three famous people who, because of their actions, "met their Waterloo" – Adam (who ate the "apple"), Napoleon (at the namesake battle), and Tom Dooley (who was hanged for murder). 


Year:
2000
94 Views
Playlists:
#1

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Waterloo, Waterloo
Where will you meet your Waterloo?
Every puppy has its day, everybody has to pay
Everybody has to meet his Waterloo

Now, old Adam was the first in history
With an apple he was tempted and deceived
Just for spite the devil made him take a bite
And that's where old Adam met his Waterloo

Waterloo, Waterloo
Where will you meet your Waterloo?
Every puppy has its day, everybody has to pay
Everybody has to meet his Waterloo

Little General Napoleon of France
Tried to conquer the world, but lost his pants
Met defeat known as Bonaparte's retreat
And that's when Napoleon met his Waterloo

Waterloo, Waterloo
Where will you meet your Waterloo?
Every puppy has its day, everybody has to pay
Everybody has to meet his Waterloo

Now, a feller whose darling proved untrue
Took her life, but he lost his too
Now he swings where the little birdie sings
And that's where Tom Dooley met his Waterloo

Waterloo, Waterloo
Where will you meet your Waterloo?
Every puppy has its day, everybody has to pay
Everybody has to meet his Waterloo

 Struggling with Waterloo? Become a better singer in 30 days with these videos!


Stonewall Jackson

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (January 21, 1824 – May 10, 1863) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and one of the best-known Confederate commanders after General Robert E. Lee. His military career includes the Valley Campaign of 1862 and his service as a corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia under Robert E. Lee. Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863. The general survived with the loss of an arm to amputation, but died of complications from pneumonia eight days later. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting not only its military prospects, but also the morale of its army and of the general public. more »

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Written by: JOHN D. LOUDERMILK, MARIJOHN WILKIN

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind

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    "Waterloo Lyrics." Lyrics.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 24 Jan. 2021. <https://www.lyrics.com/lyric/3698106/Stonewall+Jackson>.

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